Mar 29, 2021
Take It One Resolution At a Time
I often get overwhelmed by what society expects of us and find it difficult to prioritize my resolutions. Society expects us to be productive nearly all the time while staying up to date on current events, eating healthy, exercising for an hour every day, and looking flawless while doing it. In such a fast-paced world with so many expectations, it can be hard to prioritize yourself. When taking on a new resolution, responsibility, or task, I ask myself these questions.
Sheryl Lawrence
|
3 min. read

Take It One Resolution At a Time


Many people use the new year as an opportunity to improve themselves. While everyone should always be working towards bettering themselves, it also poses challenges for many. Where do you find the time? Which resolutions mean the most to you? How do you stick to new habits when you get busy? 


I often get overwhelmed by what society expects of us and find it challenging to prioritize my resolutions. Society expects us to be productive nearly all the time while staying up to date on current events, eating healthy, exercising for an hour every day, and looking flawless while doing it. In such a fast-paced world with so many expectations, it can be hard to prioritize yourself. When taking on a new resolution, responsibility, or task, I ask myself these questions:


(1) How important is this to me?


You have to gauge how important the outcomes of the resolution are to you. If you are pursuing a resolution that is not important to you, it will be harder to stick to it and may lead you to feel unsuccessful.



(2) Will this benefit me in the long-term and help me achieve my long-term goals?


While New Year's resolutions should be something you enjoy, they should also benefit you. For example, if your New Year's resolution is to start meal-prepping, the short-term benefit is that you will have good food to eat for every meal. However, the long-term benefits are that you will save money and possibly improve your health since you won't have to eat out as much or hastily try to make food. When resolutions benefit you in the long-term, it can be easy to give up since there might not be an immediate benefit, but the end goal is a more significant accomplishment.



(3) Do I enjoy doing this?


There are many tasks in life that no one enjoys doing, such as cleaning dirty dishes or doing laundry, but we have to do them. Why add more tasks that feel like a chore? If you enjoy one of your resolutions more than the others, then you should prioritize that one. Not all resolutions have to be agonizing or prioritized with the same level of urgency.



(4) How am I going to get there?


New Year's resolutions tend to be big goals to improve ourselves, such as losing 25 pounds or meditating every day. While these seem like easy tasks on the surface, there is a reason they are New Year's resolutions - you were not motivated to complete these tasks in the past. For your resolutions, I recommend breaking them up into small goals to reward yourself along the way and to help you understand that you are making progress. 



While nearly everyone makes New Year's resolutions, it is not the only time you can create goals to improve yourself. Self-improvement is a goal everyone should be striving towards year-round!


For more tips on how to bounce back in 2021, attend our first webinar of the year! Chris Bordoni, resilience expert, podcast host, and teacher, as well as Stephanie Harrison, entrepreneur and Founder of The New Happy, will be our panelists to help you think through your renewal as we enter into 2021. We will tackle happiness, overcoming adversity, following your passions, and entrepreneurship. Link here to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bouncing-back-in-2021-with-chris-bordoni-and-stephanie-harrison-tickets-131948406235